USS Missouri

A Suite of Marine Paintings, updated

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This is a series of marine paintings I’ve been working on. Some have been shown here before in earlier stages, a few are new.

“Pound Scows at N. Truro,” for example is only recently begun. A small painting on panel, a sketch.

The question of “finish” is broad. A painting can only be definitely termed complete when it leaves the painter’s grasp.

There does come a time when painting changes from a search for what is not yet there to a recognition of what is there. At that point the flow of the eye over the work is uninterrupted. There is a totality present. The whole can be glimpsed at once. There is a definite light visible throughout. A level of vitality is apparent and it grows on us as we continue to look.

This recognition requires time. Sometimes rather deep time.

A painting changes physically as it “dries.” – Drying is a misnomer, it is more an act of healing. 

These changes run parallel to a process of acquaintance with what has been freshly created. Painter and painting change together and in relationship with each other.

Working on a suite of paintings, insights and discoveries that illuminate one work have repercussions that ripple through the way we see the others. These may lead to re-visiting what had appeared to be completed. There is an atmosphere of insight. Illumination spreads, providing another level of vitality to each work as we consider an entire suite.

Paintings and photographs seem similar at first glance. Paintings are not like photographs. These elements of time within their making are only apparent as we spend time looking. Paintings require that we encounter them in person. No single snapshot can capture a painting. What we see on a screen is only an indication of what is there. It is at best a first impression.

But, that’s what we have here, pictures-of-paintings.

Paintings need to be confronted directly. While a photograph is instantaneous – both in its making and in the way it is seen – paintings take time to materialize. To create an experience. To perceive over time. The experience deepens and broadens with our engagement.

Here’s the same gallery without the JavaScript:

See these and others of my Marine Paintings here.

About these ads

One thought on “A Suite of Marine Paintings, updated

  1. Pingback: Updated Suite of Marine Paintings | Antonio Dias

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s